Ashley Baldauf ’12 Accepted to Innovative Medical School Program

Ashley Baldauf graduated with a degree in Forensic Sciences last fall and will begin an innovative medical school education this July at A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona.

The AT Still program begins on the Arizona campus for the first year, and then students move to one of 11 special community health center-based campuses across the country to finish their training with CHC faculty.

Students learn in small group settings, learning clinical presentations, observing patient care, and gaining an understanding of the local health system and community health practices. Later, students complete their clinical rotations at their community health center, in associated hospitals, as well as with affiliated healthcare providers at select healthcare institutions.

The centers are a boon to the communities they serve and help students develop a focus on patient care in underserved communities. Ashley will graduate as a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine.

Ashley was thrilled to discover that one of the 11 centers is Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center, where she will spend years 2,3, and 4 of her training. She will be in a class of only 10 students at Waianae. She is looking forward to staying close to home and family, but also says, “I want to make a difference in the community”.

People have fears of not succeeding. I tell them, you CAN do it, have faith in yourself, don’t let anyone downgrade you or tell you who you are. Don’t tell yourself that you won’t do well because you can do well.

Ashley herself is a graduate of Waipahu High School, and is hoping to be an inspiration to her relatives and friends from her hometown to dream big and make a difference too.

“I really encourage people from my high school to go to Chaminade; I talk to my brothers too.
People have fears of not succeeding. I tell them, you CAN do it, have faith in yourself, don’t let anyone downgrade you or tell you who you are. Don’t tell yourself that you won’t do well because you can do well.”

“I want to have a future, for my family. I am the first one to get a college degree in my family.”

Ashley worked with Chaminade’s Office of Health Professions Advising and Undergraduate Research to plan for a career in medicine. It was through the office that she learned about the opportunity with AT Still University. Ashley firmly believes that the close relationship with instructors and the extra attention she was able to receive at Chaminade have helped her succeed:

“I wasn’t a chemistry fan until I took chemistry. It opened my eyes to what is possible. Joel Kawakami is a great teacher, a great advisor; he encouraged me. At Chaminade, there are a lot of partnerships with institutions on the mainland, and a lot of research going on here too. There is always the opportunity to do something. Going to the conferences, such as ABRCMS, helped to build my confidence. You can’t be shy about presenting your research!”

“The special thing here is that the faculty at Chaminade wants you to succeed. There is always help.“

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Blaze Mancillas ’09 Lands Role in Golden Boy on CBS

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Chaminade Alum Blaze Mancillas (BFA Communications, Performing Arts Minor ’09) will be guest-starring in the new CBS police drama Golden Boy (midseason premiere on Tuesday February 26 at 10pm EST) as Arroyo Jr., a cocky rookie NYPD officer who is the son of veteran officer Tony Arroyo. Blaze will debut in the episode titled “Young Guns,” airing Friday, March 8. Mancillas’ acting career began at Chaminade.

I think the hardest part about following your dream is figuring out what your dream is. Chaminade is a great place to discover your dreams because it’s a supportive environment that really empowers students to try everything… Once you figure out what your dream is, surround yourself with like-minded dreamers, never give up and don’t forget to have fun! – Blaze Mancillas, Actor

An Interview with Blaze:

What inspired you to become an actor?

Acting started off as a happy accident. A dear friend of mine and Dayton Exchange student Joe Melendrez sat me down on a bench at the Courtyard in Henry Hall and begged me to take his part in a show because he couldn’t manage the time commitment. I went in for a rehearsal just to try things out and the director, Bro. Gary Morris, liked what I brought to the table and took a leap of faith and cast me in a production of “Sylvia” by A.R. Gurney. At age 17 I played a married man going through a midlife crisis who falls in love with a stray dog. I’m not sure if I was very good but I had a lot of fun. Before I knew it I was changing my major and trying to sponge up all the knowledge I could from our talented and supportive performing arts department (Bro. Gary Morris, Fr. Robert Bouffier, Prof. Timothy Carney).

What would you say to someone (a student) who wants to follow their dream?

I think the hardest part about following your dream is figuring out what your dream is. Chaminade is a great place to discover your dreams because it’s a supportive environment that really empowers students to try everything. At Chaminade I competed on the Cross Country, Golf and Soccer teams as well as working in student government, the school newspaper and doing plays and musicals. That’s what college is all about: trying everything and thus learning about others and yourself. Once you figure out what your dream is, surround yourself with like minded dreamers, never give up and don’t forget to have fun.

I started at Chaminade studying Biology with ambitions to one day go to medical school. When I graduated I completed a degree in Broadcast Communications with a minor in Performing Arts on my way to getting my MFA in acting at Columbia University in New York City. If you had asked me if I would become an actor during my freshman year at Chaminade I would have laughed. You never truly know your potential until you give yourself a chance to succeed as well as a chance to fail. I find that I learn more about myself when I make mistakes.

What is the most interesting or remarkable thing to you right now about your participation in Golden Boy?

Aside from the endless tables of snacks and food on set I would say the most interesting part of being a part of project like this is the great deal of focus and attention everyone puts into their job. Being on set may seem a little overwhelming because there are a ton of people running around but each person has a very specific job that when done well enables others to do their own job to the best of their abilities. I didn’t need to worry about my costume, make up, hair or even what I was going to have for lunch. Not only was this liberating but held me accountable for my work. I was able to focus on the one job I was hired to do: act.

Do you have any anecdotes to share about Chaminade?

During my first show at Chaminade it was nothing short of a miracle that I didn’t fall asleep in rehearsals. After a long day of class I would have a sweat-drenched practice with the Cross Country team and then shuffle into the Loo Black Box Theater where I would rehearse and shovel cold Chef Boyardee down my throat. The Silversword Cafe wasn’t open after cross country practice so despite his disdain for lukewarm, canned pasta, Bro. Gary would allow me to eat my modest dinner when we had breaks between scenes.

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